Organic Dog Food Ingredients

Unadulterated Organic Dog Food Ingredients Are Essential for Dog Health
Significantly, the origin of organic dog food ingredients – its systematical production and the way it is processed – is the key to avoiding any negative aspects of the organic industry.

How Regulations Affect Organic Dog Food Ingredients

organic dog treatsOrganic gastronomy in itself is a self-regulated industry that is established by government defined ethics and international organic industry trade organizations. All organic food must be produced in compliance of these regulations to be regarded as organic.

These standards take account of organic dog food ingredients that must also be free of GMOs (genetically modified organisms). Principles heavily regulate the use of chemical additives, irradiation, and industrial solvents in organic foods. The use of synthetic pesticides and chemical fertilizers are also limited.

In the United States, processed organic foods are required to contain at least 95% organic ingredients and 5% regulatory approved ingredients to be certified organic. Under current regulations, manufacturers are not required to list any additives present in an ingredient that comprises 5% or less of the product excluding water and salt. Also, it is NOT required to specify whether additives are natural or synthetic.

Approved Organic Pesticides and Food Additives

Bacillus thuringensis or Bt toxin is commonly used in the commercial organic food industry. It is a microorganism that produces toxic chemicals found to eradicate insects. Since it is primarily used as a pesticide for organic food crops, the Bt toxin’s effects are widespread with regard to the production of organic dog food ingredients. Studies in the formulation of the Bt toxin as a pesticide show that it contains preservatives associated with food allergies. Further research concludes Bt toxin has destructive transmutations on red blood cells in mammals.

Pesticide chemicals are known to activate a gene that causes overproduction of estrogen in animals. The release of pesticides into the environment is concerning; documentation concedes that pesticides are a contributing factor in cancers, birth defects, autoimmune and hormonal disruption. The ecological effects play a fundamental role of pesticide absorption in humans, animals, and foods. As a whole, organic dog food ingredients are not cosseted from the consequences of environmental impairment caused by pesticide chemicals.

Growth Hormones are widely used food additives in agricultural production. These can be steroid hormones or the injectable protein hormones. Currently in the U.S., there are six different forms of steroid hormones approved by the FDA for use in food production: progesterone, estradiol, testosterone, zeranol, melengestrol acetate and trenbolone acetate. Melengestrol acetate (MGA) is a steroidal progestin often added to animal feed as a growth stimulator. MGA is just one of several hormones used as growth stimulators in the food industry that are being disputed. Testing indicates that MGA hormone levels are found to be higher in edible meats than would otherwise occur naturally. This isn’t without damaging impacts on organic dog food ingredients, agricultural ecosystems and various health effects.

The growth hormone bovine somatotropin (rbST) is an injectable protein hormone utilized in dairy cattle. Bovine somatotropin (rbST) triggers cells to make chemicals, growth factors, in order to increase growth rate and milk production.

The NYU Langone Medical Center agrees that more research is required on the health effects of long term useage of hormones utilized in the food industry.

Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine studies on (rbST) maintain that growth factors cause a higher acceleration rate in breast cancer cells. Analysis also substantiates increased incidents of antibiotic residue in meats following (rbST) use. Bovine somatotropin has been linked to breast enlargement in young girls.

Further corroboration is required on the corollary effects of (rbST) and its carcinogenic repercussions, in addition to its long term usage in organic dog food ingredients.

Growth hormone concentrations found in our groundwater exhibit adverse health effects on corporeal and aquatic life. Continuous exposure to low hormone concentrations in water, meats and crops have been linked to cancers, endocrine disruption, fertility, and other antithetical health effects in humans and animals.

Propylene and Ethylene, additional food additives regularly used in organic food production, have adversely had an effect on organic dog food ingredients.

Ethylene is a plant hormone; a naturally occurring small hydrocarbon gas used to force artificial ripening in foods harvested prematurely. It is known biologically as an aging hormone. Ethylene affects growth, development, texture, color and premature ripening of foods utilized in organic dog food ingredients. Alternatively, it has been used as an anesthetic, to make detergents, cosmetics, paints, and household products, including ethylene glycol, also known as automotive antifreeze.

Depending on how Ethylene is processed and applied, it can be extremely toxic if ingested. Symptoms might include problems with respiration, heart, vomiting, nausea, unconsciousness, convulsions, or coma.

As an aging hormone, the concerted levels of Ethylene in organic dog food ingredients are controversial. Currently, there is no supporting data focused on the safety of long term consumption of Ethylene.

Propylene or Methylethylene is a byproduct of oil refining, coal and natural gas processing. Used extensively in the chemical industry, it produces a variety of chemical products, ranging from foams, plastics, resins, hydraulic fluids and antifreeze. Propylene is classified by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration as “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) for use as a direct food additive in organic dog food ingredients.

Research indicates excess exposure of Propylene can produce a depressant result on the central nervous system. Over time, daily consumption of organic dog food ingredients or other foods that contain Propylene can result in toxicity. Animals and humans can exhibit a variety of symptoms potentially progressing to amnesia, sedation, coma, asphyxiation and death. If a dog drinks antifreeze the chance of survival are minimum at best.

Nonagricultural (non-organic) substances allowed as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as “organic” or made with organic specified ingredients – Organic Dog Food Ingredients

  • Acids (Alginic; Citric – produced by microbial fermentation of carbohydrate substances; and Lactic)
  • Agar-agar
  • Animal enzymes – (Rennet – animals derived; Catalase – bovine liver; Animal lipase; Pancreatin; Pepsin; and Trypsin)
  • Bentonite
  • Calcium carbonate
  • Calcium chloride
  • Calcium sulfate – mined
  • Carageenan
  • Dairy cultures
  • Diatomaceous earth – food filtering aid only
  • Egg white lysozyme
  • Enzymes – must be derived from edible, nontoxic plants, nonpathogenic fungi, or non-pathogenic bacteria
  • Flavors – non-synthetic sources only and must not be produced using synthetic solvents and carrier systems or any artificial preservative
  • Glucono delta-lactone – production by the oxidation of D-glucose with bromine water is prohibited
  • Kaolin
  • L-Malic acid
  • Magnesium sulfate, non-synthetic sources only
  • Microorganisms – any food grade bacteria, fungi, and other microorganism
  • Nitrogen – oil-free grades
  • Oxygen – oil-free grades
  • Perlite – only as a filter aid in food processing
  • Potassium chloride
  • Potassium iodide
  • Sodium bicarbonate
  • Sodium carbonate
  • Tartaric acid Waxes – nonsynthetic (Carnauba wax; and Wood resin)
  • Yeast – non-synthetic, growth on petrochemical substrate and sulfite waste liquor is prohibited
  • Autolysate; Bakers; Brewers; Nutritional; and Smoked – non-synthetic smoke flavoring

organic dog treatsProcess must be documented

Synthetics Allowed – As In – Organic Dog Food Ingredients

  • Activated charcoal – only from vegetative sources; for use only as a filtering aid
  • Alginate
  • Ammonium bicarbonate – only as a leavening agent
  • Ammonium carbonate – only as a leavening agent
  • Ascorbic acid
  • Calcium citrate
  • Calcium hydroxide
  • Calcium phosphates (monobasic, dibasic, and tribasic)
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Cellulose – for use in regenerative casings, as an anti-caking agent (non-chlorine bleached) and filtering aid
  • Chlorine materials – disinfecting and sanitizing food contact surfaces, residual chlorine levels in the water shall not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act (Calcium hypochlorite; Chlorine dioxide; and Sodium hypochlorite)
  • Cyclohexylamine – for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization
  • Diethylaminoethanol – for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization
  • Ethylene – allowed for postharvest ripening of tropical fruit and de-greening of citrus
  • Ferrous sulfate – for iron enrichment or fortification of foods when required by regulation or recommended (independent organization)
  • Glycerides (mono and di) – for use only in drum drying of food
  • Glycerin – produced by hydrolysis of fats and oils
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Lecithin – bleached
  • Magnesium carbonate – for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”
  • Magnesium chloride – derived from sea water
  • Magnesium stearate – for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic specified ingredients or food group(s),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”. Nutrient vitamins and minerals, in accordance with 21 CFR 104.20, Nutritional Quality Guidelines For Foods.
  • Octadecylamine – for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization
  • Ozone Pectin (low-methoxy)
  • Peracetic acid/Peroxyacetic acid – for use in wash and/or rinse water according to FDA limitations. For use as a sanitizer on food contact surfaces
  • Phosphoric acid – cleaning of food-contact surfaces and equipment only
  • Potassium acid tartrate
  • Potassium carbonate
  • Potassium citrate
  • Potassium hydroxide – prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables except when used for peeling peaches during the Individually Quick Frozen (IQF) production process
  • Potassium iodide – for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic specified ingredients or food group(s),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic” Potassium phosphate – for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specific ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”
  • Silicon dioxide
  • Sodium acid pyrophosphate – for use only as a leavening agent
  • Sodium citrate
  • Sodium hydroxide – prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables
  • Sodium phosphates – for use only in dairy foods
  • Sulfur dioxide – for use only in wine labeled “made with organic grapes,” provided that total sulfite concentration does not exceed 100 ppm
  • Tartaric acid
  • Tetrasodium pyrophosphate – for use only in meat analog products
  • Tocopherols – derived from vegetable oil when rosemary extracts are not a suitable alternative
  • Xanthan gum

Organic Dog Food Ingredients

Synthetic substances allowed for use in organic livestock production

In accordance with restrictions specified in this section, the following synthetic substances may be used in organic livestock production:

As disinfectants, sanitizer, and medical treatments as applicable:

1. Alcohols

  • Ethanol-disinfectant and sanitizer only, prohibited as a feed additive
  • Isopropanol-disinfectant only

2. Aspirin-approved for health care use to reduce inflammation

3. Atropine – federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR Part 205, the NOP requires:

(i) Use by a licensed veterinarian; and

(ii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 56 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 12 days after administering to dairy animals.

4. Biologics – Vaccines

5. Butorphanol – federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR Part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR Part 205, the NOP requires:

(i) Use on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian

(ii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 42 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 8 days after administering to dairy animals

6. Chlorhexidine – Allowed for surgical procedures conducted by a veterinarian. Is allowed for use as a teat dip when alternative germicidal agents and/or physical barriers have lost their effectiveness

7. Chlorine materials – disinfecting and sanitizing facilities and equipment. Residual chlorine levels in the water shall not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Calcium hypochlorite

Chlorine dioxide

Sodium hypochlorite

8. Electrolytes – without antibiotics

9. Flunixin – in accordance with approved labeling; except that for use under 7 CFR Part 205, the NOP requires a withdrawal period of at least two-times that required by the FDA.

10. Furosemide – in accordance with approved labeling; except that for use under 7 CFR Part 205, the NOP requires a withdrawal period of at least two-times that required by the FDA.

11. Glucose

12. Glycerine – Allowed as a livestock teat dip, must be produced through the hydrolysis of fats or oils.

13. Hydrogen peroxide

14. Iodine

15. Magnesium hydroxide – federal law restricts this drug to use on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR Part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR Part 205, the NOP requires use on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian.

16. Magnesium sulfate

17. Oxytocin – use in postparturition therapeutic applications

18. Paraciticides. Ivermectin – prohibited in slaughter stock, allowed in emergency treatment for dairy and breeder stock when organic system plan-approved preventive management does not prevent infestation. Milk or milk products from a treated animal cannot be labeled as provided for in subpart D of this part for 90 days following treatment. In breeder stock, treatment cannot occur during the last third of gestation if the offspring will be sold as organic and must not be used during the lactation period for breeding stock.

19. Peroxyacetic/peracetic acid – for sanitizing facility and processing equipment

20. Phosphoric acid – allowed as equipment cleaner, provided that, no direct contact with organically managed livestock or land occurs

21. Poloxalene – requires that poloxalene only be used for the emergency treatment of bloat

22. Tolazoline – federal law restricts this drug to use by lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR Part 205, the NOP requires:

(i) Use by the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian;

(ii) Use only to reverse the effects of sedation and analgesia caused by Xylazine

(iii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 8 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 4 days after administering to dairy animals.

23. Xylazine – federal law restricts this drug to use by the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR Part 205, the NOP requires:

(i) Use by the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian;

(ii) The existence of an emergency

(iii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 8 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 4 days after administering to dairy animals.

(b) As topical treatment, external parasiticide or local anesthetic as applicable

(1) Copper sulfate

(2) Iodine

(3) Lidocaine – as a local anesthetic. Use requires a withdrawal period of 90 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter and 7 days after administering to dairy animals.

(4) Lime, hydrated – as an external pest control, not permitted to cauterize physical alterations or deodorize animal wastes

(5) Mineral oil – for topical use and as a lubricant

(6) Procaine – as a local anesthetic, use requires a withdrawal period of 90 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter and 7 days after administering to dairy animals

(7) Sucrose octanoate esters – in accordance with approved labeling As feed supplements – None As feed additives

(1) DL–Methionine, DL–Methionine—hydroxy analog, and DL–Methionine—hydroxy analog calcium – for use only in organic poultry production until October 1, 2010.

(2) Trace minerals, used for enrichment or fortification when FDA approved.

(3) Vitamins, used for enrichment or fortification when FDA approved.

(e) As synthetic inert ingredients as classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for use with non-synthetic substances or synthetic substances listed in this section and used as an active pesticide ingredient in accordance with any limitations on the use of such substances.

EPA List 4—Inerts of Minimal Concern

Ex-cipients, only for use in the manufacture of drugs used to treat organic livestock when the ex-cipient is: Identified by the FDA as Generally Recognized As Safe; Approved by the FDA as a food additive; or Included in the FDA review and approval of a New Animal Drug Application or New Drug Application.

Non-organically produced agricultural products allowed as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as “organic.” – As In – Organic Dog Food Ingredients

Only the following non-organically produced agricultural products may be used as ingredients in organic dog food ingredients or on processed products labeled as “organic,” only in accordance with any restrictions specified in this section, and only when the product is not commercially available in organic form.

(a) Casings, from processed intestines

(b) Celery powder

(c) Chia ( Salvia hispanica L. )

(d) Colors derived from agricultural products

(1) Annatto extract color – water and oil soluble.

(2) Beet juice extract color

(3) Beta-carotene extract color, derived from carrots

(4) Black currant juice

(5) Black/Purple carrot juice color

(6) Blueberry juice color

(7) Carrot juice color

(8) Cherry juice color

(9) Chokeberry—Aronia juice color

(10) Elderberry juice color

(11) Grape juice color

(12) Grape skin extract color

(13) Paprika color – dried, and oil extracted

(14) Pumpkin juice color

(15) Purple potato juice

(16) Red cabbage extract color

(17) Red radish extract color

(18) Saffron extract color

(19) Turmeric extract color

(e) Dillweed oil

(f) Fish oil (Fatty acid – stabilized with organic ingredients or only with ingredients on the National List, §§205.605 and 205.606.

(g) Fructooligosaccharides

(h) Galangal, frozen

(i) Gelatin

(j) Gums—water extracted only (Arabic; Guar; Locust bean; and Carob bean)

(k) Hops ( Humulus luplus )

(l) Inulin-oligofructose enriched (m) Kelp—for use only as a thickener and dietary supplement

(n) Konjac flour

(o) Lecithin—unbleached

(p) Lemongrass—frozen

(q) Orange shellac-unbleached

(r) Pectin (high-methoxy). * http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELPRDC5068682

45 Organic Permitted Food Additives In Organic Dog Food Ingredients (EU)

Sulfur dioxide, Vegetable carbon, Annatto, Bixin, Norbixin, Calcium carbonate, Sulphur dioxide, Potassium metabisulphite, Sodium nitrate, Potassium nitrate, Lactic acid, Carbon dioxide, Malic acid, Ascorbic acid, Sodium ascorbate, Tocopherol-rich extract, Lecithins, Sodium lactate, Citric acid, Sodium citrates, Calcium citrates, Tartaric acid, Sodium tartrates, Potassium tartrates, Monocalcium phosphate, Alginic acid, Sodium alginate, Potassium alginate, Agar, Carrageenan, Locust bean gum, Guar gum, Arabic gum, Xanthan gum, Glycerol, Pectin, Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, Sodium Carbonates, Potassium carbonates, Ammonium carbonates, Magnesium carbonates, Calcium chloride, Calcium sulphate, Sodium hydroxide, Silicon dioxide, Talc, Argon, Helium, Nitrogen and Oxygen – http:// www.faia.org.uk/food-choices/organic-food/ How

GMOs Affect Organic Dog Food Ingredients

Biotechnology or genetic engineering (GE) allocated the term GMO or GM, which signifies genetically modified organisms. Specifically, the conversion of DNA of different animal or plant species through methods categorized as gene splicing. Consequential, a development of volatile amalgamations of animal, plant, viral and bacterial genes that otherwise cannot evolve biologically.

GMO foods are used in commercial production intended to meet demand and supply of the populous. GMO foods produce more rapidly; additionally, they are more impervious toward certain diseases and pests. However, GMO foods are not totally resistant to many challenges. Considered high risk ingredient foods, GMOs are known to have incidents of contamination and cross pollination. One serious concern is focused on the GMO’s capacity to contaminate organic crops fed to cattle, thereby impacting all human grade meat and by-products utilized in organic dog food ingredients and ingredient usage in all other human foods along with animal feed labeled for consumption.

GMO foods are lacking in taste and are nutritionally deficient compared to foods grown organically.

Research indicates that GMO foods retain higher concentrations of pesticides than that of organically grown foods. Studies also demonstrate that continual exposure to trace amounts of pesticides found in food has a higher toxicity rate and negative implication on overall health. Most conventionally grown foods used for dog food ingredients and human consumption contains GMOs. It is not unreasonable that future combinations of organic foods will consist of various GMOs.

How To Choose Organic Dog Food Ingredients Without Additives

Purchasing organic dog food from smaller manufacturers that support local organic farming communities is a sensible choice. These manufacturers likely produce better quality products using organic dog food ingredients that are Free of potentially harmful natural or synthetic pesticides and additives. Local organic food markets and farmers markets support cooperative organic farming that offer healthier fresh foods. Buying organic dog food from manufacturers that purchase directly from these organic farmers or organic distributors significantly reduces the likelihood of non-organic food additives in the dog food prior to manufacturing and during manufacturer processing.

Smaller reputable dog food brand manufacturers seem to be more inclined to openly answer consumer questions. As in the disclosure of origins, production practices and processing methods of foods in the formulation of that specific manufacturers brand of organic dog food ingredients. The concern in offering a more nutritionally wholesome organic dog food extends far beyond their brand name and more about the safe healthy organic dog food ingredients that dogs consume. Reconsider spending just bit more for organic dog food; the value of quality and health far supersedes saving loose change. The future wellbeing of a dog’s life is dependent on the quality organic dog food ingredients they consume today.

Organic Food Facts – Pet Bistro Organic Dog Food Ingredients

Pet Bistro Organic Dog Food Ingredients is made with one hundred percent (100%) certified organic human-grade ingredients.

NO Organic By-Products – NO Additives – NO Chemicals – NO 5% Rule

Pet Bistro uses top quality ingredients; fit for dog and human consumption foods.

Healthy Organic is our quality standard – Doggy Delicious ~ Naturally Nutritious

The USDA has recognized that chickens raised organically have higher concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids and lower arsenic levels than conventionally raised chickens. Pet Bistro is made with certified organic chicken.

A 2003 U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Genetic Lab and Rutgers University in New Jersey study established that organically grown blueberries had a significantly higher total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity content in comparison to their conventionally grown counterparts. Pet Bistro Bark~Scotti is made with certified organic blueberries. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 56, pages 5,788-5794 (2008)

A study completed by The Organic Center and professors from the University of Florida Department of Horticulture and Washington State University confirmed, based on nutrient comparisons of 236 organic and conventionally grown foods, that organic foods provide higher concentrations of nutrients. Pet Bistro uses all certified organic dog food ingredients.

Studies also substantiate that organic foods contain higher micronutrients and protein concentrations than that of conventionally grown food. Pet Bistro organic dog food ingredients and other dog food products are made from completely certified organic foods.